Mixed Media, Quilts, Collage, and Fiber Arts

Joan Schulze, 2017 Recipient of Fresno Museum Council of 100 Distinguished Woman Artist Award

FRESNO ART MUSEUM UPCOMING EXIBITION

JOAN SCHULZE: Celebrating 80

Opening Reception, September 22
Artist Luncheon and lecture, September 23, 2017
Details coming!

Joan describes her work: “At the heart of my work, whether it be quilts, collages, or books,
is the transformation of fabric and paper in layered constructions. Improvising during the painting, image-transfer processes and collaging of materials, while chasing an idea at hand creates adventure in the studio—thoughts are made visible.”

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Joan Schulze @ Shenzhen University Art Gallery

Poetic License: Drawing, Quilts and Collage

Shenzhen University Art Gallery, China
September 10—26, 2016

In the beginning are Schulze and the materials. A pathway forward is forged.

joan-shenzhen-poster Joan Schulze’s “Poetic License” presents an eclectic mix of works with narrative, both subtle and direct, drawings which are more subdued even playful, and collages in fiber and paper which border on being autobiographical. Using printed media to convey her interest in perceptions from life, the images and printed ephemera that she collects are used as a jumping off place to comment on woman’s roles, current events and smaller subjects such as the everydayness of things.

Schulze has distinct bodies of work:  Collage in quilts and works on paper; Non-traditional drawings using packing tape and the photocopy machine; Haiku, an on-going series in small format, started in 1998.

It has been said that Schulze subverts and abstracts the written word or text in any language. Her drawings relate to childhood scribbles which morph into line, word and image. Meaning is subverted using fragments without regard for normal orientation. Upside down, inside out, truncated, rearranged, mirrored, ignoring scale until these collages take on different roles and meaning, seldom as they were intended. They are exuberant and optimistic, inviting you to pay attention to details. These work’s do not begin and end with her viewpoint. They often show how a person moves through the world paying attention to details and then translates the ineffable into form and a new meaning.

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Disappearing Conversations

SAN FRANCISCO, CA — Opening at the Goodman 2 Art Center on Potrero Hill is Disappearing Conversations, a survey exhibition of the work of Dan Abramson (1961-2012) and Joan Schulze (1971 – present), highlighting their work in collage and mixed media. Each artist’s career has spanned five decades.

Joan Schulze has gained international prominence in the fiber arts as a studio artist, teacher, lecturer and juror. Most admired and written about are her restless, often experimental quilts. Her other forms of expression include collage and artist’s books. Born in Chicago in 1936, she taught elementary school and was a full-time mother of four before declaring herself an artist in 1970. In 1995, she became one of the original artists in residence at the Goodman 2 Art Center.

Changing Places, Dan AbramsonUtilizing images from her own photographs and mixed media, Joan produces complicated collages on paper and fabric, the works of a mature artist with a playful and creative output. Schulze’s current studio work is her most adventurous to date and will be featured in this exhibition.

Dan Abramson (1932-2012) was self-trained, creating outside any one particular school or medium on canvas, paper, assemblage, gallery boxes, functional art and collage. In his first period, Dan was a Mad Man by day, creating iconic 1960s ads, and a prolific painter at night. His first solo show was in New York in 1961, featuring brash abstract expressionist canvases and, later on, pop realism. In 1967, the NY State Council on the Arts included Abramson’s work in an exhibition that featured Albers, Dine, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg and Warhol. Yet, at that point of recognition the young artist ceased to publicly exhibit his work.

He didn’t re-emerge as a visual artist until the late 1980s in Los Angeles.

Disappearing Conversations marks the first West Coast retrospective of his work, featuring works on canvases from the 1960s, his iconic gallery boxes informed by Joseph Cornell, lost paper collages and assemblage throughout his career.

Review from ArtDaily.org

Gallery Hours

Open Saturday and Sunday, noon – 5pm and by appointment.
Closed July 4th.

Goodman 2 Art Center
1695 18TH Street
San Francisco, CA, 94107

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" ... Improvising during the painting, image-transfer processes and collaging of materials while chasing an idea at hand creates adventure in the studio where thoughts are made visible."